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Carmen's Cave
I am Carmen. I have an about me link.
I'm just a college-ing adult with a blog. I post often. Very rarely nsfw.
Fandoms I blog include: Kingdom Hearts, Pokémon, Harry Potter, Animal Crossing, Disney, Avatar: TLA and LoK, Lord of the Rings, The World Ends with You, Rooster Teeth, Achievement Hunter, Sonic the Hedgehog, Adventure Time, animes, mangas, other cartoons, western comics, bands/music, video games, and lots of other random things.
I'll tag any reasonable requests. Feel free to stick around and talk with me!

dardardearest:

Everyone saw this coming. Featuring the lovely Lindsay Tuggey.

♫ Deep in the Hundred Acre Wood, where Christopher Robin plays, you’ll find the enchanted neighborhood, of Christopher’s childhood days.

A donkey named Eeyore is his friend. And Kanga and Little Roo. There’s Rabbit and Piglet and there’s Owl. But most of all Winnie the Pooh. 

kyssthis16:

Remember when Mitt Romney spoke at the NAACP National Convention

LEGENDARY

almeow:

Steven cries openly and that’s important. 

Steven is the main character of the show, and is around the same age  as the show’s target audience (7-13) on CartoonNetwork so in many ways her resents of the age group they are trying to get to. 

And he is often shown, crying, usually reacting to something that’s upset him greatly, it seems 100% natural responds for a young kid like Steven, right? 

So if its so understandable and natural, why is it important that Steven openly cries and doesn’t seems to be ashamed about show his emotions? 

It’s because that show is meant for kids from 7 to 13 and it is unbelievable rare to show an main character, a male main character, openly crying like Steven does.

Even if a male character is going to toward something horrible, it’s more often they are shown with a single heroic tear or simply never show them crying.

In a culture that often tells boys at a very young age that crying is weak and girly. It is highly important to show Steven, a character young boys are suppose to relate to, crying and reaction to things emotionally in a heathy and age appropriate way. It’s highly important to show young boys that showing emotions does not make them weak, 

It’s also important is talk about Steven’s emotions are handled by the show too. Steven is never called a crybaby or a weakling because he cries or gets upset. Everyone in Steven’s live (included the show itself) treats Steven’s feeling seriously, they are never shown as small thing that don’t matter.

Steven shows kids that it’s okay to cry when you are upset, it does not make you weak. Steven still does heroic things, and he’s still a funny happy little kid, even if it means he gets emotional sometimes. 

So yeah, Steven cries a lot and it’s really important. 

nature-nymph:

shasana:

sancophaleague:

Recently I was in the shopping mall  and I happened to hear a conversation between some people discussing their dislike for this black girl’s hairstyle who had just previously walked by. One of them called the girl’s  hairstyle “ghetto”, then followed up by saying  “I hate when black girls put all them colors in their hair”. It led me to ask this question, what is ghetto really?  Because I have seen similar hairstyles with Caucasian women never labeled as ghetto. The word “ghetto” has a negative stigma attached to it and it seems like ghetto has become synonymous for “Black People”.What determines whether something is Ghetto or not? Why do some people consider one ghetto and not the other? Is being crafty with the supplies available to me ghetto?  Is being creative while black unacceptable? Does the price of something determine whether you should consider it ghetto or not? Or maybe I’m wrong…. Please do share your thoughts….@hated_logic

You’re exactly right. Just like when Black people improvise, it’s ghetto, but let a middle-to-upper class white person do it, it’s a lifehack, or being thrifty, or economical, or thinking out of the box, or brilliant, or whatever.

THIS FOR ALL OF ETERNITY

nature-nymph:

shasana:

sancophaleague:

Recently I was in the shopping mall  and I happened to hear a conversation between some people discussing their dislike for this black girl’s hairstyle who had just previously walked by. One of them called the girl’s  hairstyle “ghetto”, then followed up by saying  “I hate when black girls put all them colors in their hair”. It led me to ask this question, what is ghetto really?  Because I have seen similar hairstyles with Caucasian women never labeled as ghetto. The word “ghetto” has a negative stigma attached to it and it seems like ghetto has become synonymous for “Black People”.
What determines whether something is Ghetto or not? Why do some people consider one ghetto and not the other? Is being crafty with the supplies available to me ghetto?  Is being creative while black unacceptable? Does the price of something determine whether you should consider it ghetto or not? Or maybe I’m wrong…. Please do share your thoughts….

@hated_logic

You’re exactly right. Just like when Black people improvise, it’s ghetto, but let a middle-to-upper class white person do it, it’s a lifehack, or being thrifty, or economical, or thinking out of the box, or brilliant, or whatever.

THIS FOR ALL OF ETERNITY